Wishers and workers

Consider these two types of people.

Wishers and workers.

The wisher plays the piano. The wisher dreams of performing an original piece in front of a large audience. But instead of working, practicing, sitting with the tension of the blank page, they wish.

They wish that it was easy.

They wish that the environment was right.

They wish that the government would do this instead of that.

They wish that people would understand them and how dreadful it is to live with such unrecognized talent.

They wish that somebody would pick them into fame so that they could circumvent the path of most resistance – the path of the worker.

The worker shares the dream of the wisher. But unlike the wisher, the worker sits at the keys to practice.

The worker is not without fear. But despite their fear, they practice because they know that the only alternative is to live a life of regret – a regret of having spent their entire life avoiding their life’s work.

Embedded in these types of people are two forces: tension and regret.

In the wisher, the force of tension is winning. The tension of the blank page is too great for the wisher to overcome. Thus the wisher says I’ll do it tomorrow, which becomes I’ll do it tomorrow, which becomes I’ll do it eventually.

The wisher is beat by the uncomfortable feeling of accepting the fact that they’re not yet ready to fulfill their dreams.

The wisher buries their dreams in the hole of tomorrow.

In the worker, regret is the force that propels them to act on their ambition. Regret of spending an entire life avoiding a life’s work is enough to scare them straight into doing the work today.

The worker plucks their fortune off the branches of now.

Both the worker and the wisher are scared of the possibility of never fulfilling their dream. But the wisher is afraid of a life of work, and the worker is afraid of a life of wishing.

Who will you choose to be?

 

 

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