Artificial curiosity

How long have you believed that writing isn’t spiritually and financially important?

If you went through the traditional school system, the answer is: years.

School doesn’t understand how important it is to learn to write. If it did, they’d actually teach kids how to write. They’d teach kids how to write in classes which have nothing to do with writing. Financial literacy classes would teach kids why it pays to learn to write. Health class would teach kids the benefits of writing for cognitive clarity. But school doesn’t do this. Instead, school teaches kids the capital of Iowa.

Writing is an expression of our natural curiosity. And if one of the purposes of school is to “instill a sense of curiosity” in children, they’re not doing a very good job at it.

Speaking of jobs…

If you have a job where every question is already answered, you haven’t escaped the “school” mindset. You’re still suppressing your natural curiosity. Natural curiosity needs no explanation. Everyone is curious – including the most close-minded of us. But how curious we are depends on how long we’ve believed that curiosity is a worthless trait.

People don’t get tired of their jobs because they’re boring. People get tired of their jobs because they’re not allowed to be naturally curious. But they are encouraged to be artificially curious.

For example, the boss says, “feel free to ask any questions.” But what the boss means is, “ask questions because then I can show you the employee manual.” The employee manual is where all the answers are. To waver from these answers would be a costly mistake. “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

The employee manual is the same thing as the teacher’s version of the textbook. Same idea. Different place. The answers in the textbook and manual coincide with the questions you’re expected to ask. This is artificial curiosity.

To let our natural curiosity shine is to risk being picked on. Who doesn’t remember raising their hand in school, only to be made fun of for asking a “stupid question”? This is why public speaking is still our most common fear. We are still afraid of being the laughing stock of the class.

Our natural curiosity is what raises our hand to ask a question.

Our natural curiosity makes us all geniuses.

A genius is someone who’s raising their hand all the time.

A genius isn’t fearless. A genius is always a being of duality. There’s a paisley of fear within every act taken by the genius.

Fear in one hand. Action in the other.

The alternative? The answer is in the textbook.

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