The Wrong Way to Read and the Meaning of Insight

Your mind, like your body, needs the nutrients and vitamins of good ideas in order to survive and thrive. But as we grow older, our ego turns our head away from good ideas like the child avoiding the choo-choo train of a spoonful of peas.

Good ideas aren’t found out there. They’re found in here, in you. Wisdom means nothing to those who don’t listen. To really read a good book, you first need to actually want to read it. Your own inclination comes from within, not from without.

Therapy is a waste of time (for the client and therapist) to the person forced to go to therapy. “I, according to so-and-so, need help.” That never works. The same is true of reading.

You need to understand your motivations for reading a book. Are you thinking of buying this book because Barnes & Noble says everyone in your town is reading it? Do you want to read because that’s what smart people do? Is the self-improvement regime court ordering you to read a book because if you don’t, then you must be a loser? Or do you want to read because there’s something you need to figure out?

There’s a mistake in assuming all answers come from the outer world. Yes, good books help, but how you approach the bookhow you read the book – matters more than what the book is about. Are you reading so that you can show off to your friends? Are you reading just to confirm your barely stable mental model of the world? Or are you reading because you’ve been wearing a dunce cap your entire life, and you’d like to be less of a dunce?

Ask yourself: are my actions in the outer world strengthening, harmonizing, feeding my mind with the proper nutrients?

The outer world nourishes your inner world only when your inner world is understood, and by understood I mean that it is respected: your inner world — your psychology — is never fully understood.

To have insight is to question your reasons for doing anything other than eating, drinking, defecating, and breathing.


P.S: I turned 26 yesterday. Thanks to all who sent me birthday wishes, and big thanks especially to those who sent me some good books. I super appreciate it.

The idea transforms

The idea transforms as it spreads from one psyche to another.

Some ideas hit brick walls. Ideas that hit brick walls are ideas that die.

All successful people are lucky. You’re either born into success or you’re not. You need to be picked to be rich and famous and I’ll never be picked so I’ll never be rich and famous. These are defense mechanisms built to protect weak presuppositions about the world. And though the presupposition isn’t well thought out, the defenses are ironclad.

The idea isn’t metaphysical. It carries real weight. This is obvious in people who seem to be walking on water despite the chaos around them. Those who soar are those who don’t latch onto self-gratifying ideas with an iron fist.

A good idea means nothing to the individual who doesn’t take good care of their mind.

The sage doesn’t waste their breath on the mind surrounded by an iron curtain. They’d rather travel to that humble village south of here. The villagers there are very welcoming.

My Most Ambitious Reading Project: The Collected Works of C.G Jung.

jung

Jung was a juggernaut.

Inspired by Poor Bjorn’s post about his reading the entire “Story of Civilization” by Will Durant, I’d like to share with you what I consider to be my most ambitious reading project: to read through the entire collected works of C.G Jung (The Bollingen Series as translated by RF.C Hull. Can you believe that just about every word that Jung wrote was translated by one person?)

There are 20 volumes in total (the last 2 are an index and bibliography) containing Jung’s commitment to think through millennia of myth and symbolism to explain what every good psychologist is supposed to explain: why we do what we do. 

So far, I’ve only read ‘Two Essays on Analytical Psychology’ which I found to be absolutely fascinating. Highly recommended for anyone even slightly interested in the nuances of human behavior.

This is going to take a long time. Not only because of the length of the books, but because the content in many of his books is difficult to understand (anima and animus, the mana personality, the syzygy –  to name just few esoteric concepts) and he frequently references other authors like Gothe, Freud, Nietzsche, Lao Tzu, and many other ancient scriptures and texts. And finally, because many of Jung’s sentences are so profound that it’s like being punched in the gut when you’re not prepared. You just have to take a minute to let the depth of what you’ve just read sink in. These are books that you can’t speed read.

But this goal has no due date. It’s part of a larger goal of mine, which is to read all the great books in the subjects that interest me the most. To name a few, this includes all the great books by Dostoevsky, Freud, Carl Rogers, Nietzsche, Seneca. On the business/productivity/21st century skill side, this includes all the great books by Tim Ferriss, Seth Godin, Ryan Holiday, Ray Dalio, Jocko Willink, and many others.

Is there a subject that you’re so passionate about, so enthralled by, that you want to read everything that was ever written on it? Let me know. I’d love to hear from you.