Ungrowing Pains

You will feel more pain if you choose to not make decisions for yourself not assert yourself when appropriate (and it's usually more appropriate than you think) not lean into your strengths not take control of how you spend your time not take control of with whom you spend your time not ignore people who … Continue reading Ungrowing Pains

You means you!

"Man, this You guy could do anything he wants," I thought as I flipped through the pages of self-help book number 45. The message flew over my head. If a self-help author starts talking about you, they mean you -- not some other guy named You. Yes, you. "What? Me? Oh, no -- there must … Continue reading You means you!

Two groups of words

Proactive. Ambitious. Productive. Efficient. I like those words. Those words convey movement. When we embody any of those words, we signal to others that we mean business. Because even when we're sitting in the backseat of a car, we can still get things done. We can listen to a podcast. Or we can write down … Continue reading Two groups of words

Do you want this, or that?

Change is both big and small. We're only doing this for 20 minutes a day. But it's 20 minutes a day. 7 days a week. That's 140 minutes (2.3 hours) a week spent doing this. Overtime, if you're patient, small adjustments to your daily routine will lead to a big change. Instead of doing that … Continue reading Do you want this, or that?

How to Stop Comparing Yourself to Others and Find Work That Suits You

Naval Ravikant once said, "A sick person wants only one thing." I'm sick. I want only one thing - to stop comparing my blog to other people's blogs. Seeing other people's blogs is now a way to inspire and depress me. It's great to see other writers sticking it out on their own, making money … Continue reading How to Stop Comparing Yourself to Others and Find Work That Suits You

Man’s search for meaning (in murdering): what I learned from reading a 500 page book about nazi doctors

  There’s a short book about finding meaning through suffering that many of you have read. It’s called Man’s Search for Meaning. It resonates with nearly everyone who reads it because Frankl writes directly into the human condition - the condition of suffering. It takes only 154 pages for Viktor Frankl to teach us how … Continue reading Man’s search for meaning (in murdering): what I learned from reading a 500 page book about nazi doctors